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Showing posts from June, 2024

INVENTOR OF PNG'S FIRST FULL SIXTEEN (16) NUTRIENT CONTENT ORGANIC LIQUID FERTILIZER

Mr Christopher Tep is the inventor and owner of PNG's first full sixteen nutrient content organic liquid fertilizer known as Grow Hariap Organic Liquid Fertilizer. For food crops to bear maximum yields, they must have a sufficient supply of sixteen known nutrients. Grow Hariap has been tested in Australia and PNG laboratories to have all the sixteen vital nutrients that crops need to produce maximum yields. The fertilizer is currently being distributed exclusively by Brian Bell throughout PNG. Mr Tep is an agricultural scientist with 30 plus years of experience in the agriculture industry in both private and public sectors. His story is very inspiring. We interviewed him at length about how he invented the fertilizer. We will publish the interview soon on this platform as well as our YouTube channel. Please like or subscribe to our YouTube channel for the full interview.

Nobel Laureate prize winner Professor Wole Soyinka

Nobel Laureate prize winner Professor Wole Soyinka is considered one of the most prominent and influential Nigerian writers. While there are many notable Nigerian writers, it is difficult to identify one who is on the same level as Soyinka in terms of his literary achievements and impact.  However, some notable Nigerian writers who have made significant contributions to Nigerian literature include: ●Chinua Achebe: Known for his novel "Things Fall Apart," Achebe is a prominent figure in Nigerian literature and has been recognized for his work in promoting African literature. ●Ben Okri: A Nigerian poet and novelist, Okri is known for his vivid and imaginative writing style, which often explores themes of identity, culture, and social justice. ●Buchi Emecheta: A Nigerian-born British author, Emecheta is known for her powerful and poignant writing about the experiences of African women and the challenges they face. ●Ngozi Adichie: A Nigerian-born American author, Adic

10.Facts about Zulu People of South Africa

(1). The Zulu people are the largest ethnic group in South Africa, primarily residing in the province of KwaZulu-Natal. (2). The Zulu language, isiZulu, is one of the 11 official languages of South Africa. (3). Renowned for their warrior tradition, the Zulus played a significant role in various historical c0nflicts, including the Anglo-Zulu W@r of 1879. (4). The Zulu monarchy, led by King Goodwill Zwelithini until his passing in 2021, holds cultural significance and plays a ceremonial role in modern South Africa. (5). Traditional Zulu society is organized into clans, each with its own chief and distinct identity. (6). Zulu traditional attire, including brightly colored beadwork, is a vibrant and integral aspect of their cultural expression. (7). Music and dance are fundamental to Zulu culture, with energetic and rhythmic performances often accompanying important ceremonies and celebrations. (8). The Zulu Reed Dance, an annual event, celebrates young women's coming of age and emphas

Mutabaruka (born 1952) is a Jamaican Rastafari dub poet...

Mutabaruka (born 1952) is a Jamaican Rastafari dub poet, musician, actor, educator, and talk-show host, who developed two of Jamaica's most popular radio programmes, The Cutting Edge and Steppin' Razor. His name comes from the Rwandan language and translates as "one who is always victorious". His themes include politics, culture, Black liberation, social oppression, discrimination, poverty, racism, sexism, and religion. Early life and education : Mutabaruka was born and raised in Rae Town, Kingston, Jamaica, in a household with his father, mother and two sisters. When he was eight years old his father died. Mutabaruka attended the Kingston Technical High School, where he trained in electronics for four years, going on to work for the Jamaican Telephone Company until eventually quitting in 1971. Mutabaruka was drawn into the black awareness movement of the late 1960s and early '70s. In school he read many "progressive books", including Eldridg

Ota Benga from slave traders and brought him to the U.S.

While on an expedition in Africa in 1904, an American explorer purchased a young Pygmy man named Ota Benga from slave traders and brought him to the U.S., where he became part of the “African village” at the St. Louis World’s Fair. After the Fair ended, Ota was hired by the Bronx Zoo to work as a caretaker, but as public fascination with him grew the Zoo began to “exhibit” him, leading to controversy and protests. In response to the criticism the Zoo turned Ota over to Reverend James Gordon, who placed him in an orphanage in Brooklyn. In 1910 Gordon sent Ota to Lynchburg, Virginia, where he lived with Gregory Hayes, president of Lynchburg’s Virginia Seminary. While a boy in Africa, Ota’s teeth had been chiseled into sharp points, as part of a traditional Pygmy ritual. Rev. Gordon had Ota’s teeth capped and had him dress in conventional American clothing. While attending school he was tutored in English by the poet Anne Spencer. Eventually Ota got a job working in a tobacco

SAMBURU PEOPLE OF KENYA๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ช

"The Samburu: Kenya's Colorful Warrior Tribe" In the rugged savannahs of Northern Kenya, lies the land of the Samburu people, a pastoralist tribe renowned for their colorful, beaded attire, rich cultural traditions, and nomadic way of life. The Samburu, who are closely related to the Maasai, are a tribe with a fascinating history, vibrant customs, and a deep connection to their ancestral lands. The Samburu’s iconic dress, known as “shukas,” are a striking display of their cultural identity. The colorful beaded necklaces, earrings, and bracelets are not only ornamental, but also carry symbolic meaning for each individual. The tribe’s diet primarily consists of milk and blood drawn from their livestock, which they depend on for survival. The Samburu’s traditional way of life has faced challenges with the changing times. As a pastoralist tribe, they rely on their grazing lands and livestock for their livelihood, but these resources are increasingly under pressure

SAMBURU PEOPLE OF KENYA๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ช

"The Samburu: Kenya's Colorful Warrior Tribe" In the rugged savannahs of Northern Kenya, lies the land of the Samburu people, a pastoralist tribe renowned for their colorful, beaded attire, rich cultural traditions, and nomadic way of life. The Samburu, who are closely related to the Maasai, are a tribe with a fascinating history, vibrant customs, and a deep connection to their ancestral lands. The Samburu’s iconic dress, known as “shukas,” are a striking display of their cultural identity. The colorful beaded necklaces, earrings, and bracelets are not only ornamental, but also carry symbolic meaning for each individual. The tribe’s diet primarily consists of milk and blood drawn from their livestock, which they depend on for survival. The Samburu’s traditional way of life has faced challenges with the changing times. As a pastoralist tribe, they rely on their grazing lands and livestock for their livelihood, but these resources are increasingly under pressure

Bob Marley’s wife, Rita Marley

Bob Marley’s wife, Rita Marley, has spent more than 20 years residing in Ghana ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ญ In the 1990s, she relocated to Ghana with Bob Marley’s family. In 2013, she petitioned for and was granted citizenship in Ghana. Rita Marley now has a Ghanaian name — Nana Afua Abodea. In Ghana’s Aburi, she also has a home. In Accra, Ghana, Rita Marley created a studio in memory of her deceased husband, Bob Marley. The name of it is Studio One. In Ghana, she runs a nonprofit organization. Her foundation, The Rita Marley Foundation, supports charitable endeavors. Nana Rita Marley started her musical career in the early 1960s as a vocalist with the all-female group The Soulettes, which performed with the Four Tops, Johnny Nash, and other performers of the time. Her single ‘One Draw’, which she released in 1982, was a major hit in Europe but Jamaica ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ said it was not fit for airplay. One Draw was the first reggae single to top the Billboard Disco chart, according to Jamaica Observer.

SOME POWERFUL AFRICAN FEMALE WARRIORS/LEADERS IN HISTORY

1. Amina of Zaria, Nigeria๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฌ 2. Yaa Asantewaa, Ghana๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ญ 3. Queen Amanirenas (Kush Kingdom)  4. Makeda, Queen of Sheba, Ethiopia ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡น 5. Queen Kandake, Ethiopia๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡น 6. Queen Nefertiti, Egypt ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ 7. Queen Ranavalona I, Madagascar๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฌ 8. Moremi,Ile - Ife, Nigeria๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฌ 9. Queen Cleopatra, Egypt๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ 10. Queen Nandi, South Africa ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฆ 11. Queen Muhumuza, Rwanda๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ผ 12. Queen Nzinga Mbade Angola๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ด 13. Queen Idia (Benin ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฏ Kingdom 1504 - 1550)  14. Muthoni Kirima (Mau Mau), Kenya ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ช  15. Queen Manthatisi, South Africa ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฆ #LIKOMBWA ROYAL DANCE ACADEMY,  #THINK BIG EXPERTS-THICOS ❤️

Here is a list of all Chinua Achebe's works

Here is a list of all Chinua Achebe's works, including novels, short stories, essays, and poetry collections, along with their publication years: ●Novels Things Fall Apart (1958) No Longer at Ease (1960) Arrow of God (1964) A Man of the People (1966) Anthills of the Savannah (1987) ●Short Story Collections Girls At War (1972) Beware, Soul Brother (1972) How the Leopard Got His Claws (1973) Christmas in Biafra (1973) ●Poetry Collections Beware, Soul Brother and Other Poems (1971) Collected Poems (2004) ●Essays Morning Yet on Creation Day (1975) The Trouble with Nigeria (1984) Hopes and Impediments (1988) Home and Exile (2000) The Education of a British-Protected Child (2009) There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra (2012) ●Anthologies Winds of Change (Edited by Chinua Achebe) (1977) African Short Stories (Edited by Chinua Achebe) (1987) The Heinemann Book of Contemporary African Short Stories (Edited by Chinua Achebe and Lynn Innes) (1992) ●Children's Books

Emperor Menelik II

Emperor Menelik II. The man who defeated the Italians making Ethiopia the only African country successful to resist European colonization. It served notice that Africa was not just there “for the taking”

๐™๐š๐ ๐ซ๐จ๐ฌ๐ข๐š๐ง/๐ˆ๐ซ๐š๐ง๐ข๐š๐ง ๐ก๐ฎ๐ง๐ญ๐ž๐ซ-๐ ๐š๐ญ๐ก๐ž๐ซ๐ž๐ซ ๐ฐ๐จ๐ฆ๐š๐ง ๐Ÿ๐ซ๐จ๐ฆ ๐‡๐จ๐ญ๐ฎ ๐‚๐š๐ฏ๐ž (๐œ. ๐Ÿ—๐Ÿ๐Ÿ“๐ŸŽ BCE)

L A fascinating figure from prehistory is the Zagrosian, or Iranian, hunter-gatherer woman from Hotu Cave (Mazandaran province of Iran), dating back to approximately 9150 BCE This woman embodies the Iran_N genetic cluster, a lineage that is a composite of ancient Iranian hunter-gatherers (Iran_Paleo) and Ancient North Eurasians (ANE).  Her genetic legacy is significant because the Iran_N cluster played a crucial role in the ethnogenesis of the Indus Valley Civilization. Through a complex process of admixture with the native South Asian hunter-gatherers, known as the Ancient Ancestral South Indians (AASI), this group contributed substantially to the genetic and cultural fabric of the region. The interactions between these groups facilitated the independent development of farming in the Indian subcontinent, a transformative advancement that underpinned the rise of one of the world's earliest urban civilizations. This woman's story illustrates the intricate web of preh

Young South Sudanese ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ธ man with five beautiful wives

Young South Sudanese ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ธ man with five beautiful wives. Some facts you need to know: 1. Apart from being a cultural practice in #Dinka, a man who manages multiple wives can easily manage the people and can become a leader. 2. #SouthSudanese also fought for 45 years with Arabs for liberation. This war killed 10 million men, and there is now a high chance to close the gap. 3. In South #Sudanese tradition, if you die without a wife, your younger brother or immediate family member will marry a wife for you and name the children with your name. So, as long you are born a South Sudanese, you must have descendants.

Africa, a continent rich in history and culture

Africa, a continent rich in history and culture, was a diverse and vibrant place 100 years before the colonial era began. The period prior to European colonization of Africa was characterized by the existence of powerful and sophisticated civilizations, trade networks, and diverse societies. During this time, Africa was home to thriving kingdoms and empires, such as the Kingdom of Ghana, the Mali Empire, and the Great Zimbabwe Empire. One of the remarkable aspects of Africa before colonialism was the economic prosperity and trade networks that existed across the continent. The Trans-Saharan trade routes connected the North African coast with the interior of the continent, facilitating the exchange of goods, ideas, and cultures. The trade in gold, salt, ivory, and other resources contributed to the wealth of African societies and enabled the development of urban centers and marketplaces. In addition to trade, agriculture played a significant role in the pre-colonial African

Icala lezinduna: The NKULUMANE treason story

KING Mzilikazi established his first royal town, called Mhlahlandlela just outside present day Pretoria (South Africa), in the late 1820s. After facing a series of attacks, he moved with his kingdom further north. He then established his kingdom in the Transvaal. Boers began to arrive in Transvaal in 1836, resulting in several confrontations over the next two years during which Mzilikazi suffered heavy losses. By this time King Shaka (Sgidi kaSenzangakhona) had long died in 1828. By early 1838, Mzilikazi and his people were forced northwards out of Transvaal altogether and across the Limpopo River. Just before the Limpopo they parted into two sections. Robert Moffat his close friend had advised him to relocate to present day Ntabazinduna (just outside Bulawayo). Mzilikazi told Gundwane, one of his principal indunas, to take Nkulumane (his son) with him and carry out Moffat’s instructions to travel with the sun on his right cheek in the morning and on his left cheek in the afternoon and